Nurses change lives.

Pam Cipriano, Dean, UVA School of NursingIt’s a truth we live every day. Some of us make our mark one person at a time; others impact whole families, communities, or populations suffering from conditions that diminish their quality of life. But—as we detect and treat human responses to illness, alleviate suffering, and restore health—we all share a passion and commitment to being person-centered.

People, however, now live longer and with more complex chronic conditions that, just a generation ago, might have proved terminal. So nurse scientists who study modalities of relief from the effects of biological and behavioral illness—debilitating pain, anxiety, reduced mobility, mental distress, and sleeplessness among them—are key. Our symptom science scholars’ work spans across all populations: rural, urban, ethnically diverse, and underserved. Their research also aligns with a National Institute of Nursing Research goal and the work of its Symptom Science Center to develop therapies to prevent or manage symptoms and improve outcomes. These nurses change lives.

"Some of us make our mark one person at a time; others impact whole families, communities, or populations suffering from conditions that diminish their quality of life. But—as we detect and treat human responses to illness, alleviate suffering, and restore health—we all share a passion and commitment to being person-centered."

Dean Pam Cipriano

Now in their 50th year, UVA’s nurse practitioner programs have remained at the forefront of the fight for autonomy and full practice authority. What began as a solution to a physician shortage and lack of primary healthcare has blossomed into a role that has transformed care delivery in every setting, from pediatrics and teen health to acute, palliative, and end-of-life. These nurse practitioners change lives.

Nurses also protect the vulnerable, including children and adults who fall victim to sex trafficking. We create cultures of respect, intervene when care is not equitable, or when we witness biased or racist behavior, and teach our students to do the same. I am proud of our School community because, as we move together, we change lives.

And, oh, by the way, Nurses Change Lives is on my Virginia license plate. Is it on yours?

Pam Cipriano signature 

Pamela Cipriano, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN
Sadie Heath Cabaniss Professor of Nursing and Dean
President of the International Council of Nurses
American Nurses Association President (2014-2018)
@PamCiprianoRN

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